Providence Strives for Superior Conditions in Water Infrastructures

May 18

Providence Strives for Superior Conditions in Water Infrastructures

The city of Providence is very conscientious of water quality and climate change, both of which have created new challenges for utilities.  Particularly, the effects of rising sea levels and the likelihood of more severe rainstorms. The city has been making improvements to better prepare treatment plants and pump stations against flooding, storm surge, and other severe weather effects.  When a series of heavy rain events overflowed the Pawcatuck and Pawtuxet rivers, flooding greatly affected two major pump stations. Recently, a conducted study showed several of Rhode Island’s major treatment plants would see substantial flooding during a 100-year storm when climate impacts are factored in. The study proposed adaptive strategies for flood-proofing; elevating or relocating equipment or systems. A goal for future designs include improvements that would provide continuous operation up to a specified flood elevation. The state plans to lean on its wastewater plant operators as it implements the study’s recommendations and continues to adapt to climate change. All of the outlined projects in the future will aim to restore water quality in the Greater Narragansett Bay watershed, as well as, remain focused on storm water runoff. Runoff from storms can carry nutrients, such as nitrates from lawn fertilizers, into water bodies, leading to algae blooms that can cause low-oxygen conditions; a detriment to fish and shellfish. Additional projects which will best divert and treat runoff will also include the use of natural solutions, such as the construction of rain gardens, and artificial wetlands. Providence, you’re invited!! Perma-Liner Industries requests your attendance at our Open House in Anaheim, CA. It’s taking place for three days from June 13th –June 15th and we want to see you there! It’ll be chock-full of live demonstrations and information on all of the CIPP technology available. Don’t miss this! Call us to confirm your reservation @...

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Sea-level Rise and Sewer Systems: Rhode Island Cities Unite to Resolve a Shared Obstacle

Dec 21

Sea-level Rise and Sewer Systems: Rhode Island Cities Unite to Resolve a Shared Obstacle

The Cities of North Providence and Johnston have come together for a common cause. The Sewer Infrastructures are in need of reassessments and improvement in order to rectify the dilemma of sea flooding issues, as well as basement backups. Both Cities are is in the process of evaluating the results of actions taken to address sewage overflows. Similarly, both are making water quality a priority in order to ensure the stability of the environment and how it affects their respective communities.  Each community has experienced a similar condition relating to their local sewer pipes. Currently, the main issue is sewer system overflows and strategies are being devised to overcome the problem. Several residential structures within Rhode Island’s 21 coastal communities are currently vulnerable to some level of flooding in the event of a 100-year storm, in the event of seven feet of sea level rise. Research shows that homes with basements have a significant issue as their boiler systems and hot water heaters are installed below ground level, where even a small amount of water can be problematic. Two-thirds of the homes evaluated in each community have basements, while only a small percentage are elevated. Building elevated structures will make neighborhoods safer when the risk of flooding occurs. The cities are also analyzing the layout of sewer lines, helping to determine the level of investment in infrastructure that should be made in what could eventually be part of a flood zone. And the extent of damage to any structure increases dramatically when higher seas are factored in. Studies have shown the number of buildings that would sustain 50 percent or greater damage more than quadruples with seven feet of sea level rise. The 50-percent gauge is noteworthy as any building with damage greater than that cannot simply be repaired but must be rebuilt in compliance with the latest building...

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