Full Steam Ahead! Check Out Perma-Liner Industries 2016 Events Line Up!!

Aug 18

Full Steam Ahead! Check Out Perma-Liner Industries 2016 Events Line Up!!

Undoubtedly, you are still enjoying the many highlights that this time of year brings, but as the glory days of summer begin to wane, no worries! We’ve got some exciting events scheduled for you and they’re coming up right around the corner. Mark your calendars for these informative trade shows that you won’t want to miss! First up, Perma-Liner Industries is pleased to announce we’ll be in Milwaukee on September 12-13th for the WEQ Fair. This is the place to be to gain a world of knowledge about the trenchless pipelining Industry and the equipment Perma-Liner Industries manufactures. You can expect to see our live demonstrations in the comfortable outdoor setting of the Wisconsin State Fair Park. This Wastewater Equipment Fair will have an assortment of commercial, industrial and municipal gear to become familiarized with and you’ll be intrigued to learn about the many systems used for sewer cleaning and rehabilitations. Interesting fact: did you know the Milwaukee Mile is a one-mile long oval race track located at Wisconsin State Fair Park? It’s the oldest operating motor speedway in the world. Next up! WEFTEC. Folks, this is the super bowl of trade shows. Not to be missed, and acclaimed as the largest annual water quality exhibition in the world. Also known for the most comprehensive show floor, this conference provides an unparalleled bird’s- eye view to the most cutting-edge technologies in the field. This is an event that will give you the chance to network with associates in the industry or just learn much more about the field of technology and water quality, treatments, equipment, and services. We’ll have our representatives there to answer questions, perform live demonstrations and provide resources to further your knowledge of the trenchless pipelining industry. Here’s the info to mark your calendars: The 89th Technical Exhibition and Conference is being held on Sept. 24- 28th at the New Orleans Morial Convention Center. Interesting fact: The Convention Center has 1.1 million square feet of contiguous exhibit space and is the sixth largest convention facility in the nation. Stay tuned… we’ll have more information (on even more events) on deck, coming up soon! Looking forward to see you...

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Warwick Sewer Authority and T.F. Green: A New Way to De-ice

Jun 01

Warwick Sewer Authority and T.F. Green: A New Way to De-ice

The Warwick Sewer Authority is taking part in something interesting. T.F. Green Airport is using bacteria in order to clean up the fluids used to make sure ice does not build up on airplanes. When there is a risk of ice collecting on an airplane’s wings, airport workers apply propylene glycol, which is typically used for a variety of applications. Its active ingredient can be found in engine coolants and antifreeze, airplane de-icer’s, paints, enamels and varnishes, to name a few. Traditionally the airplanes at T.F. Green Airport were sprayed in specific areas where storm drains could be closed and the fluids collected were recycled. Now, the airport has one of four de-icer management facilities in the world, where the fluids can be cleaned. The fluids are collected through the sewer system, where sensors detect any glycol. Fluids with glycol are sent to large storage tanks before they’re processed to be cleaned by bacteria that eat the chemicals. The total cost of this innovative project was approximately $36.3 million. A portion of the funding was made available through the Federal Aviation Administration and $33.5 million, through a loan from the Rhode Island Infrastructure Bank’s Clean Water Program. The bank helps run federal and state programs, including financial assistance toward wastewater. Interesting facts about how Glycol is obtained: it is first collected through a storm-drain system, or during dry weather, with the help of vacuum-like trucks. Then, sensors are used to detect the levels of glycol. If glycol is detected, it is sent to two large storage tanks that can hold 2.9 million gallons each. The glycol is then processed into two smaller tanks each holding 40,000 gallons, where the bacteria eats the chemicals. The water, which is now pre-treated, heads to the Warwick Sewer...

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Narragansett’s Benefit to Storm Water: Quahogs

Apr 29

Narragansett’s Benefit to Storm Water: Quahogs

The Narragansett Bay Commission, which operates the major sewage treatment plants for Rhode Island, recently opened the first phase of the combined sewer outfall (CSO) pollution abatement system – a planned series of tunnels that will collect waste water during rain storms and hold it until it can be properly treated. This is a common solution to the problems of CSO’s, and it’s anticipated that the outcome will be cleaner water in the upper bay. As this might result in the opening of waters long-closed to commercial shell fishing, an assessment is being conducted of the potential impact of quahog larval supply and distribution, as well as an analysis of production and market impacts if quahog landings from the upper bay increase. Shellfish are arguably Rhode Island’s most valuable resource. Just as the many beaches are a tourist attraction, the state’s quahogs, oysters and clams are an additional interest. The shellfish that inhabit Rhode Island waters are part of the Ocean State’s social and cultural fabric, and are integral pieces of a marine ecosystem that provides economic, employment, recreational and environmental benefits. Bacteria levels are down dramatically in upper Narragansett Bay over the last seven years, since the completion of the first phase of a massive public works project to contain and treat contaminated storm water. According to the latest report from the Narragansett Bay Commission, levels of bacteria have been reduced by 50 percent in the wake of construction of a 3-mile long, 26-foot-wide tunnel deep under the city that can store tainted runoff. The size of the reduction is significantly larger than the 40-percent decrease that was estimated when the Combined Sewer Overflow Project was first devised. Interesting fact: A small oyster farm can clean as much as 100 million gallons of water a day. Certified Installers take note: Perma-Liner Industries would like to invite you to our Refresher Training (Perma-Lateral™ specific) that will take place on July 12th and 13th at our Clearwater facility!! Please plan on attending. Register by calling 1-866-336-2568 or Click Here! See you...

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Rhode Island’s Resourceful Reuse of Water

Apr 14

Rhode Island’s Resourceful Reuse of Water

Providence, have you given much thought to water recycling? Water recycling is the safe reuse of treated wastewater for favorable purposes, with no risk of health hazards. A common type of recycled water is water has had pollutants removed at the municipal wastewater treatment plant.  Of the many benefits, reuse of water adds value to the ecosystem, and it aids in restoration and groundwater recharge.  The other advantage of reuse is a certain water supply, even in times of drought. Treated wastewater has more nutrients and may reduce the need for fertilizer and reduce costs for homeowners and businesses. Reuse recycles safe water for activities that do not require the high level of quality needed for human consumption. Recycling water can also eliminate or reduce discharge into waterways. Reduced water supply coupled with population growth necessitates stricter controls on water consumption and identification of alternative water sources. Wastewater reclamation projects are an essential component in meeting present and future water demand.  Due to conditions connected to previous summer droughts, Rhode Island and other New England states have found it necessary to implement water reclamation measures. Currently, Rhode Island has an integrated water resources plan that takes advantages of these alternative sources and their capacity for reuse and recycling. Save the Dates: Perma-Liner Industries has a lineup of events for you to attend!  All are invited to come to one, or if you’re adventurous, all of our LIVE DEMOS coming up in April and May. You can go to www.perma-liner.com to register and find out more but first…here are the dates and locations to save: We’ll be in Seattle April 27th, Chicago May 4th and Philadelphia May 18th. You can expect to have our knowledgeable staff showing you the latest CIPP technology. We want to see you...

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Warwick Gets Green Light on Sewer Funding

Mar 15

Warwick Gets Green Light on Sewer Funding

Rhode Island’s second-largest city took the first step toward finally installing sewers in the roughly 35 percent of the city that is not connected to the sewer system. The Warwick Sewer Authority will rehabilitate the sewer system using approximately $56 million in revenue bonds.  This aims at completing the installations which have been on hold for several years. One ordinance authorizes about $23 million in revenue bonds for treatment improvements mandated by the state Department of Environmental Management and also to raise the levee intended to protect the plant from flooding. The second ordinance authorizes about $33 million in revenue bonds to resume long-planned projects that would extend sewer lines to parts of Governor Francis Farms, the O’Donnell Hill, Northwest Gorton Pond and Bayside neighborhoods. Mandatory sewer assessments are estimated to cost $15,000 to $30,000 per household over a 20-year period. The state is requiring that cesspools near the coastline and other wetlands be replaced with either sewers or septic systems. Perma-Liner Industries can help! Go online to www.perma-liner.com or call 1-866-336-2568 to see our products and services for your sewer pipeline rehabilitation. We also have LIVE DEMOS coming up in April and May scheduled for Dallas, Seattle, Chicago and Philadelphia. We want to share the latest innovations in CIPP technology. Come see what we have to offer! Providence, have you registered yet for the NASTT’s No-Dig Show? It’s being held this month in Dallas. The NASTT No-Dig show is the largest trenchless technology conference in North America. Professionals attend to learn new techniques that will save money and improve infrastructure. We’ll have many fascinating, informative demo’s on the latest trenchless technologies along with exhibits, products and resources on all of our services locally and nationwide. You won’t want to miss it! Location: Gaylord Texan Hotel & Convention Center/ March 20th-24th 1501 Gaylord Trail Grapevine, TX...

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Out with the Old Cesspools, In with the New

Feb 16

Out with the Old Cesspools, In with the New

A new law in Rhode Island requires the removal of existing cesspools from service after a property is sold. This is among the changes to onsite wastewater rules this year in Rhode Island. Replacing a cesspool with a septic tank typically costs approximately $12,000-$15,000. Homeowners who choose to attach to their municipality’s sewage system pay around $7,000. Two percent loans are available for those who qualify. New cesspools have been banned in Rhode Island since 1968, but there are still about 25,000 in operation. The Cesspool Act that has recently been signed into law, requires cesspools to be disconnected and replaced with a modern septic system or connection to a sewer system within 12 months of the sale of the property. It’s important to note, if a homeowner closed on the sale of their property prior to January 1, of this year, the upgrade requirement does not apply until the next time the property is transferred.  The changes now being enforced are anticipated to result in approximately 400 cesspools being taken out of service every year. The removal of cesspools from yards and other property across the state, is expected to be a fundamental step toward improving the water quality of Narragansett Bay. Providence installers and residents alike, are you interested in continuing education courses? Did you know the University of Rhode Island at Kingston is offering instructive courses in wastewater processes? One of the offered courses you may be interested in is a Functional Inspections course. This one-day class focuses on how to perform a functional (point-of-sale) inspection of a conventional wastewater treatment system which is typically done prior to home sales. Topics covered include a brief inspection refresher, elements of a functional inspection, newer tools and techniques, and wastewater management. This course also includes a field trip to practice what you’ve learned.  Additional courses range from surveying techniques to nitrogen in the environment and how it effects wastewater...

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Kingston’s Conservancy and Ecosystems Grants

Jan 19

Kingston’s Conservancy and Ecosystems Grants

The Nature Conservancy at the University of Rhode Island announces a small grants program to support scholarly research in collaboration with URI faculty sponsors in ocean and estuarine science and policy. Applicants may request two years of funding (a maximum of $12,000 per year); however, approval for a second year is contingent upon progress and funding availability. This year’s proposition will focus on the following topics: restoration and conservation of marine and coastal ecosystems and the spatial extent and evaluation of ecosystems services provided by existing and restored marine and coastal habitats. Decisions will be made in February; and funds will be awarded in April. Research proposals can cover any biogeographic extent, from local to global systems. The main focus will be in proposals that provide insights into effective methods for advancing the conservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems in geographies where our region works, including RI and southern New England. The State of Rhode Island has taken a proactive role in preparing for climate change and implementing environmental policies that protect the unique coasts and watershed. However, there are not always the means to cover all of the essential financial obligations and commitments. The Coastal Institute serves as a partner on several initiatives to facilitate their completion when the focus is environmental health and aligns with the mission of the Coastal Institute. Providence, SAVE THE DATE!  Perma-Liner Industries cordially invites you to the annual WWETT show! The Water & Wastewater Equipment, Treatment &Transport Show is happening on February 17th– 20th at the Indiana Convention Center. Convention Center 100 South Capitol Ave. Indianapolis, IN 46225 U.S.A. This is the largest annual trade show of its kind, the WWETT Show attracts some 14,000 environmental service professionals and exhibitor personnel from 53 countries. Register now and...

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