Providence’s (Finely-Tuned) Sewer and Water Projects

Jul 07

Providence’s (Finely-Tuned) Sewer and Water Projects

The city of Providence is off to a busy start this month with the Greenville Avenue sewer and water line extension projects. The water line has been completed from the pump station up to approximately 300 feet east of Pine Hill Road. Upgraded infrastructures, including pipeline replacements, are a necessary commodity in an effort to keep the systems working smoothly. For the time being, traffic may continue to be affected in the area of construction. The city has replaced a good portion of the sewer in recent years, including 6,500 linear feet of 16-inch water pipe, 1,620 linear feet of sewer pipe. Additionally, seven hydrants and seven manholes were installed. Fortunately, a sewer overflow abatement program, which began as an impetus to reduce contaminants, is now complete with an underground storage tunnel. The tunnel contents are pumped back to Providence’s treatment facility. This effective strategy has improved the water quality in leaps and bounds when compared to a time the upper bay suffered numerous closures. Storm water runoff has also had a large effect on bacteria laden shellfish, partly due to the deterioration of septic systems. These conditions have led to continual harvesting restrictions to large areas of Narragansett Bay, leaving only a small section open to shellfishing. Interestingly, shellfish work hand in hand with the environment as they filter algae from the water. A large oyster can filter up to 50 gallons a day, making them awesome helpers on behalf of cleaner water. Providence, did you know? In addition to sewer extensions, water meters will also be upgraded and modernized. An initiative to install a new meter system is now underway. Expected to be an effective tool for time management, the new devices will be read remotely. The current system requires reading the meters from inside consumers’ homes. Contact Perma-Liner for all of your pipelining...

Read More

Warwick Gets Green Light on Sewer Funding

Mar 15

Warwick Gets Green Light on Sewer Funding

Rhode Island’s second-largest city took the first step toward finally installing sewers in the roughly 35 percent of the city that is not connected to the sewer system. The Warwick Sewer Authority will rehabilitate the sewer system using approximately $56 million in revenue bonds.  This aims at completing the installations which have been on hold for several years. One ordinance authorizes about $23 million in revenue bonds for treatment improvements mandated by the state Department of Environmental Management and also to raise the levee intended to protect the plant from flooding. The second ordinance authorizes about $33 million in revenue bonds to resume long-planned projects that would extend sewer lines to parts of Governor Francis Farms, the O’Donnell Hill, Northwest Gorton Pond and Bayside neighborhoods. Mandatory sewer assessments are estimated to cost $15,000 to $30,000 per household over a 20-year period. The state is requiring that cesspools near the coastline and other wetlands be replaced with either sewers or septic systems. Perma-Liner Industries can help! Go online to www.perma-liner.com or call 1-866-336-2568 to see our products and services for your sewer pipeline rehabilitation. We also have LIVE DEMOS coming up in April and May scheduled for Dallas, Seattle, Chicago and Philadelphia. We want to share the latest innovations in CIPP technology. Come see what we have to offer! Providence, have you registered yet for the NASTT’s No-Dig Show? It’s being held this month in Dallas. The NASTT No-Dig show is the largest trenchless technology conference in North America. Professionals attend to learn new techniques that will save money and improve infrastructure. We’ll have many fascinating, informative demo’s on the latest trenchless technologies along with exhibits, products and resources on all of our services locally and nationwide. You won’t want to miss it! Location: Gaylord Texan Hotel & Convention Center/ March 20th-24th 1501 Gaylord Trail Grapevine, TX...

Read More

Out with the Old Cesspools, In with the New

Feb 16

Out with the Old Cesspools, In with the New

A new law in Rhode Island requires the removal of existing cesspools from service after a property is sold. This is among the changes to onsite wastewater rules this year in Rhode Island. Replacing a cesspool with a septic tank typically costs approximately $12,000-$15,000. Homeowners who choose to attach to their municipality’s sewage system pay around $7,000. Two percent loans are available for those who qualify. New cesspools have been banned in Rhode Island since 1968, but there are still about 25,000 in operation. The Cesspool Act that has recently been signed into law, requires cesspools to be disconnected and replaced with a modern septic system or connection to a sewer system within 12 months of the sale of the property. It’s important to note, if a homeowner closed on the sale of their property prior to January 1, of this year, the upgrade requirement does not apply until the next time the property is transferred.  The changes now being enforced are anticipated to result in approximately 400 cesspools being taken out of service every year. The removal of cesspools from yards and other property across the state, is expected to be a fundamental step toward improving the water quality of Narragansett Bay. Providence installers and residents alike, are you interested in continuing education courses? Did you know the University of Rhode Island at Kingston is offering instructive courses in wastewater processes? One of the offered courses you may be interested in is a Functional Inspections course. This one-day class focuses on how to perform a functional (point-of-sale) inspection of a conventional wastewater treatment system which is typically done prior to home sales. Topics covered include a brief inspection refresher, elements of a functional inspection, newer tools and techniques, and wastewater management. This course also includes a field trip to practice what you’ve learned.  Additional courses range from surveying techniques to nitrogen in the environment and how it effects wastewater...

Read More